Venous Diseases | Who Is At Risk For Vein Diseases?

Varicose veins

People Who Are At Risk Of Venous Diseases
Many things can increase your risk for varicose veins and venous disease. Carrying extra weight on your body, pregnancy, having a lack of movement and aging are all possible causes of venous disease. Having a family history of varicose veins and vein disease can also play a role in whether you will have these problems too.

Carrying heavy weight around the pelvis can contribute to vein problems, as can abdominal tumors, which can elevate pressure that leads to varicose veins. Working in an environment that requires you to stand for long periods of time may also add pressure to the veins. Patients who have cardiovascular disease in addition to varicose veins are at higher risk for developing other vein problems, such as high blood pressure. Other vein issues are correlated to varicose veins, including too much water retention, congestive heart failure, swelling in the legs, and skin infections or skin conditions. Weakened valves of the veins cause varicose veins, which usually become that way over a long period of time rather than by short-term activities, like crossing one’s legs.
Three sets of vessels comprise the circulatory system, which includes:

  • Arteries
    Arteries bring oxygen-carrying blood from the heart to the tissues. In the normal course of blood circulation, small amounts of fluid and protein leak from arteries and veins.
  • Lymphatics
    Lymphatic vessels bring protein-rich fluid back into the circulation. The third type of blood vessel is the vein.
  • Veins
    Veins bring oxygen-depleted blood from the organs and tissues to the heart and lungs, where it is re-oxygenated.

Blood is pumped through the body from the heart and returns to the heart through muscle contraction of the arms and legs. Because the venous system uses low pressure for circulation, the physical signs of venous disease sometimes require rigorous testing before your physician can come up with a diagnosis.

Diseases of the veins typically fall into two categories, which include either blockage from blood clots (thrombosis) and/or insufficient vein drainage. Read more about thrombosis and insufficient vein drainage.

Contact The Vein Centre to get a proper diagnosis of your vein problems today!

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